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drn211

Yurizan Beltran/Yuri Luv passes away

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so sad.  :(  first shyla stylez, then august ames, now yurizan beltran???  and all within the last month???  what the hell is going on???  :angry:

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6 hours ago, davemanddd said:

so sad.  :(  first shyla stylez, then august ames, now yurizan beltran???  and all within the last month???  what the hell is going on???  :angry:

A WORK IN PROGRESS: THE LIFE EXPECTANCY OF A PORN STAR

BY LISA ANN

"The average life expectancy in America is 78 years. The average life expectancy of a porn star is only 37 years. No, I don’t mean career life expectancy. I mean actual life. Take a minute and think about that. Have you ever heard of another career where the people involved have a life expectancy less than half the national average? I doubt it. This a cold hard fact, yet probably one of the least talked-about and least looked-into fact in the world we live in today."

Read More: http://thestashed.com/2016/04/14/a-work-in-progress-the-life-expectancy-of-a-porn-star/

More articles from Lisa Ann: http://thestashed.com/author/lisaann/

Edited by BadArtie

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13 hours ago, BadArtie said:

A WORK IN PROGRESS: THE LIFE EXPECTANCY OF A PORN STAR

BY LISA ANN

"The average life expectancy in America is 78 years. The average life expectancy of a porn star is only 37 years. No, I don’t mean career life expectancy. I mean actual life. Take a minute and think about that. Have you ever heard of another career where the people involved have a life expectancy less than half the national average? I doubt it. This a cold hard fact, yet probably one of the least talked-about and least looked-into fact in the world we live in today."

Read More: http://thestashed.com/2016/04/14/a-work-in-progress-the-life-expectancy-of-a-porn-star/

More articles from Lisa Ann: http://thestashed.com/author/lisaann/

I think that 37 number is flawed. While there were stag films and the like going back to the early 1900s there weren't any true porn stars until the "golden age of porn" in the 70s. The number of stars then boomed with the advent of VHS and, especially, the internet. What this means is that most of the porn stars that have every worked are in the 20-50 range and the comparatively few that are older are under 75. I think that over the next 50 years or so that number is going to go up from 37 to something much nearer to 78. Only then will we have a true idea of the life expectancy of a porn star.

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On 12/15/2017 at 4:57 PM, drn211 said:

I think that 37 number is flawed. While there were stag films and the like going back to the early 1900s there weren't any true porn stars until the "golden age of porn" in the 70s. The number of stars then boomed with the advent of VHS and, especially, the internet. What this means is that most of the porn stars that have every worked are in the 20-50 range and the comparatively few that are older are under 75. I think that over the next 50 years or so that number is going to go up from 37 to something much nearer to 78. Only then will we have a true idea of the life expectancy of a porn star.

As far as the age 37, here is one site that lists ages and causes of death: http://danielrjennings.org/TheAverageLifeExpectancyOfAPornStar.html I believe this list is where everyone gets 37 years of age as the average life expectancy for pornstars. I agree that the 37 number could be flawed. This is not a scientific study nor a likely statistically representative sample nor a complete list of adult performers.

Here are a few more sites that lists the porn performers that have passed on:

http://thekbh.org/dead_hos.htm

http://www.rame.net/faq/deadporn/

One can also conduct searches for pornstars that have passed away from the Internet Adult Film Database or Wikiporno.

Internet Adult Film Database - http://www.iafd.com

Wikiporno - http://www.wikiporno.org

More relevant articles:

‘After Porn Ends’ Documentary Reveals The Dark Side Of The Industry And Life After Porn (VIDEO)

From: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/15/after-porn-ends-documentary_n_1518238.html

“Porn star” as a title on your resume will severely limit your career options. It will also likely complicate your romantic and familial relationships.

A new documentary, “After Porn Ends,” examines the personal lives and careers of stars of the adult industry. It focuses particularly on the transition to life after porn and features porn stars Asia Carrera, Mary Carey, Houston and others. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/After_Porn_Ends

The film describes a career in porn as a “brief shining moment” of fame, sex and money. “Nobody thinks it’s going to end,” a man in the film explains. Former porn stars also discuss the de-humanizing element of porn that insiders often don’t want to admit.

“I just started feeling really depressed about it. I can’t do anything else. This is what I’m good at. This is all I know,” former porn star Crissy Moran said. (In 2013, Crissy Moran started www.newcrissymoran.com to reflect her life after porn. As of 2013, Moran works for Treasures, a 501(c)3 nonprofit founded in 2003 by a former dancer to help women heal from what she calls "sexual brokenness.")

Part of the biggest struggle is trying to leave their pasts behind. “What are you going to do ten years from now when your kid brings home a magazine?” she said. “It doesn’t go away.”

 

From Pink Cross, which is no longer an active 501(c)3 nonprofit charity. 

https://thepinkcross.org

Average life expectancy of a porn star is 36.2 years – 1
208 porn stars died prematurely from aids, drugs, suicide, homicide, accidental and medical since 2014 – 2
#1 suicide method among porn stars is by hanging – 3
67 porn stars that we know of committed suicide – 4
66% of porn performers have Herpes, a non-curable disease. – 5
2,396 cases of Chlamydia and 1,389 cases of Gonorrhea reported among performers since 2004. – 6
Over 100 straight and gay performers died from AIDS. – 7
36 porn stars died that we know of from HIV, suicide, homicide and drugs between 2007 and 2010. – 8
Of all known child abuse domains, 48 percent are housed in the United States. – 9
26 cases of HIV reported by Adult Industry Medical Healthcare Foundation (AIM), since 2004. – 10

From Truth Behind the Fantasy of Porn by Shelley Lubben 

https://download.e-bookshelf.de/download/0004/3323/75/L-X-0004332375-0012590146.XHTML/index.xhtml

Male porn star Christian XXX also speaks openly about the widespread drug use. He wrote on his blog in January, 2008, “I have seen all manner of drugs on set, at parties, in cars, everywhere. If I had to guess, I would put marijuana use at 90 percent of all people involved in the industry (performers, directors, crew, agents, drivers, owners, office workers, etc.). I have been on a set where a girl has passed out DURING a sex scene with me (she was abusing oxycontin). Just recently a girl overdosed on GHB (a party drug that is a clear, odorless drug that doesn’t mix well with alcohol) on set. I have seen a girl win a prestigious AVN Award, not show up to accept the award, and then fall into the throes of drug use that caused her to lose at least 50 pounds and drop off the face of the earth.”

Edited by BadArtie

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i believe that age 37 number for the life expectancy of a porn star is a flawed number as well since it doesn't take into account all the ones that are still alive.  age 37 is just simply the average age at which the ones that have died actually died.  i mean using that same logic i could say that the average life expectancy for a member of the military was just 22 years of age, but again that doesn't take into account all the ones that are still alive.  age 22 is just simply the average age of the ones that have died actually died.  it is not a measure of their total overall life expectancy.  there are a vast number of military personnel who are still alive and will most certainly approach a number much closer to the average life expectancy of 78 years old when measured over an entire lifetime.  to make that measure simply by the average age at death of the ones that have died is statistical manipulation at its worst.

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The Porn Myth: Uncovering the Truth about Sex Stars

By Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor

"The average span of a performer's career is usually only about six to 18 months, so the benefit of participating in these things isn't usually apparent to the people who are in it at the time," Kayden Kross, an adult film actress and writer, told LiveScience.

Not only that, Kross said, but many actresses are reluctant to help researchers, because they're worried that the studies will be used against them by anti-pornography activists. [The Sex Quiz: Myths, Taboos and Bizarre Facts]

"The difficulty with this population has always been access," said James Griffith, a psychologist at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania and one of the few scientists to delve into the subject. "It's a very difficult population to define."

Read More: https://www.livescience.com/27428-truth-about-porn-stars.html

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The Pornography Industry: What Everyone Needs to Know - Book By Shira Tarrant

 
What Is the “Damaged Goods” Hypothesis?
 
The damaged goods hypothesis is one explanation that some people use to explain why women become porn performers. In sum, the claim is that women work in pornography because they were sexually abused as children, and they grow up to become drug addicts with a host of psychological problems. “Damaged goods” refers to stereotypes and perceptions as opposed to verified professional assessment that sex workers have low psychological health and self-esteem, with high rates of drug use and shame. These negative stereotypes about women who work in adult entertainment are often used to condemn the pornography industry or to judge the women who work in it. Yet despite preconceived notions and political justifications built on these views, until recently, no study had been conducted to test the “damaged goods” hypothesis.
 
Is This Hypothesis True?
 
In 2012, James Griffith, Sharon Mitchell, Christian Hart, Lea Adams, and Lucy Gu published the findings of a study they conducted to test the accuracy of the damaged goods hypothesis. The team wanted to know whether women in the adult industry would report harmful psychological traits and life experiences more often than women who are not porn performers. The four psychologists and one professional from the Adult Industry Medical Healthcare Foundation compared self-reports by 177 porn performers with a sample of women who were not porn performers, matching both groups in terms of age, ethnicity, and marital status.
 
The research team was interested in sexual behaviors and attitudes, self-esteem, quality of life, and drug use among porn actresses. Their findings, published in the Journal of Sex Research, found that compared to women outside the adult industry, female porn actors were more likely to identify as  bisexual, experienced their first sexual encounter at a relatively early age, and had more sexual partners.
 
None of the factors, however, are automatically problems. On the face of it, if the women who have had these life experiences don’t find them troubling, there is no reason to presume that they are. Whether one interprets bisexuality, early sexual encounters, or number of sexual partners as a problem may reflect conservative moral panic or religious views more so than proving that women in porn are “damaged.”
 
Female performers were between three and nine times more likely than the matched group to have used ten different types of drugs (marijuana, hallucinogens, ecstasy, cocaine, heroin, other opiates, methamphetamine, tranquilizers, barbiturates, and other sedatives). It is important to note that these findings do not measure drug addiction but the rate at which participants ever tried or experimented with a drug. The only significant difference in terms of how often drugs were used in the six months prior to the survey revealed that marijuana was the only drug with a moderately higher use rate among porn actresses compared with women outside of porn.
 
Significantly, the comparison of porn performers and non-porn performers found no difference in the rate or incidence of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). This may be unfortunately due to the widespread sexual victimization of young girls across the board. About 36 percent of porn actresses reported being victims of childhood sexual assault; about 30 percent of the matched sample said they were victims of childhood sexual abuse. However, these findings certainly do not indicate a vastly lower rate of CSA among women outside of the pornography industry. There are several limitations to the original study and the later investigation of the “damaged goods” hypothesis. First, the research focuses only on women. Although this is important, future studies will hopefully include male performers, and gender fluid or trans actors. Second, the research asks only whether participants experienced childhood sexual abuse.
 
 
 
Edited by BadArtie

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Psychotherapy with Women Who Have Worked in the “Sex Industry”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3508959/

From: Logo of innclinneuro

Abstract

Psychotherapy is effective for a myriad of mental health symptoms, with the clinical situation dictating the most applicable method. For episodes of severe stress including acute depression and anxiety, supportive mechanisms (crisis interventions and shoring up existing coping skills and strategies) may be the best fit. During periods of relatively milder symptomatology a psychodynamic approach may be utilized with the same patient (focusing on self-reflection and a more in-depth exploration). This article focuses on the use of psychotherapy with women working in the sex industry, whether indoor (such as strip clubs and cabarets) or outdoor (such as prostitution and escort services). These women frequently experience violence in various forms, and most report multiple traumatic experiences, both during their developmental years and while working in the industry. A composite case is included that illustrates some of the supportive and psychodynamic psychotherapy techniques that can be applied when treating these individuals.

Keywords: Supportive psychotherapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, counseling, post-traumatic stress disorder, sex industry, sex worker

INTRODUCTION

Women involved in the adult sex industry (e.g., exotic dancers and prostitutes) who have experienced trauma often feel shattered and hopeless.1,2 Some escape the lifestyle, yet with limited resources many find themselves “trapped” in the business.1,3 Many have been attacked, exploited, and humiliated, and mind-altering substances often are sought to temporarily mollify the physical and emotional pain.3 The most prevalent mental health symptoms are in the mood and anxiety spectrums, but are often coupled with addiction to substances.14 Many of these women who use substances state they are anesthetizing themselves to be able to work in the sex industry.1,2,4 Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is widespread in this subset of the population and usually is attributed to childhood abuse and/or sex industry-related trauma.14 A substantial number of these women are homeless single mothers of multiple children, under-educated, and medically uninsured; have a high rate of untreated health-related problems; and often have legal problems.14 Table 1 lists important statistics regarding the sex trade industry.

TABLE 1
Important statistics about the sex industry1,2,4
  • The sex industry is a $57 billion worldwide business annually.
  • The United States has more strip clubs than any other country in the world.
  • There are more than 3,800 adult clubs nationwide, which employ over 500,000 people.
  • Currently, more women are employed in the sex industry than in any other point in time.
  • Between 66-90% of women in the sex industry were sexually abused as children.
  • Relative to the general population, women in the sex industry experience higher rates of substance abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, domestic violence, depression, violent assault, rape and posttraumatic stress disorder.
  • The sex industry is estimated to be a $15 billion industry annually in the United States.

 

There has been little research on violence against women in the sex industry until recently. Many in society have assumed that women who work in the industry do so willingly and somehow are shielded from sexual and physical harm or that their participation is fully volitional.1,2 More recently, studies show that both indoor (e.g., strip clubs, cabarets) and outdoor (e.g., prostitution, escort services) sex work heighten the risk of being assaulted.1,2,4 Farley and Kelly1 found that 82 percent of women who were engaged in the outdoor sex industry (prostitution) reported having been physically assaulted and 68 percent reported having been raped.

 

Read More: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3508959/

Edited by BadArtie

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